Download 1001 symmetrical patterns: A complete resource of pattern by Jay Friedenberg;Jacob Roesch PDF

By Jay Friedenberg;Jacob Roesch

Artists, image designers, and craftspeople are regularly searching for new assets of idea and new principles to include into their paintings. This booklet is an intensive print and digital library of symmetrical styles in altering preparations and colorways, encouraged by way of conventional iconic motifs present in numerous cultures all through heritage. The styles are fitted to many functions, together with cover, tile, cloth, jewellery, architectural, product, site, and picture layout. The enclosed CD-ROM permits the reader to breed, resize, or another way regulate the entire designs for their personal reasons.

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Valéry 1961: 72) What characterizes the poetic state of mind in the reader is the feeling of this intimate union between sound and sense. We shall de-psychologize Valéry’s description and say that in literature, especially poetry, the sound and the sense of a sentence or of a word are inseparable; in ordinary language, they are not. To emphasize the consequences of Valéry’s view, I generalize his criterion of literariness: A sentence S of English is literary if and only if (a) there is no sentence T of English, T not identical to S, that “paraphrases” S, and (b) there is no sentence T* in any natural language L, L not identical to English, that “translates” S.

Here is a story that the English psychologist Richard Gregory (1970, 1973, 1986) tells: Given a (roughly) two-dimensional image on the retina, the brain tries to determine what three-dimensional object is being seen, or, what distal three-dimensional object causes the proximal two-dimensional stimulus. Although the retinal image could be the result of any number of different projections onto a plane of any number of different three-dimensional objects, the brain either rejects or never considers odd or complex possibilities.

Yet in its third use the term applies to an individual, a hermaphrodite, that lies outside the extension of a predicate with the intension [YOUNG & MALE & NONFEMALE & HUMAN] but lies inside the extension of a predicate with the intension [YOUNG & MALE & HUMAN]—that is, of the predicate ‘boy’. In the framework of Atlas (1974, 1975a,b, 1978b, 1979, 1989), one would say that the English lexeme ‘boy’ is semantically nonspecific with respect to [NONFEMALE]. There are not two lexemes ‘boy1’ and ‘boy2’ with intensions [YOUNG & MALE & HUMAN]1 and [YOUNG & MALE & NONFEMALE & HUMAN]2.

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