Download ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī’s Philosophical Journey: From by Cecilia Martini Bonadeo PDF

By Cecilia Martini Bonadeo

The current paintings offers a close account of the to be had information on ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī’s biography, an overview of his philosophical idea, and a close research of his remodeling of pre-Avicennian Greek and Arabic metaphysics.

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Additional info for ʿAbd al-Laṭīf al-Baġdādī’s Philosophical Journey: From Aristotle’s Metaphysics to the ‘Metaphysical Science’ (Islamic Philosophy, Theology and Science: Texts and Studies, Volume 88)

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67 In their selection of Aristotle’s writings to be studied and commented on, the Ancients followed an order with the aim of granting Aristotelian philosophy a structure based on the idea that logic was the foundation of ontology and metaphysics: the Categories became the introduction to Aristotle’s writings. 12 (twelfth century), E – Parisinus Graecus 1853 (tenth century) and J – Vindobonensis Phil. 100 (tenth century) – cf. the following studies: Harlfinger (1979), 7–35; Moraux (1967), 17–41; Bernardinello (1970); Bernardinello (1982), 39–54; Hecquet–Devienne (2000), 103–71; Ronconi (2012), 201–225; (2004), 413–441.

24 Müller. Cf. the English translations of the passage in Rosenthal (1975), 50–51 and in Gutas (1999), 155–193. 147 Meyerhof (1930), 389–429. 148 Tardieu (1986), 1–44; Tardieu (1987), 40–57; Tardieu (1990). 149 Cf. Luna (2001a), 482–504, where she reviews Thiel (1999); Lameer (1997), 181–191. 150 Strohmaier (1987), 380–389; Gutas (1999), 153–193. 151 Vallat (2004), 15–23, 367–372, quotation at page 367. 152 There is a textual link between the exegetical works composed in Alexandria and more in general between the Neoplatonic approach to the study of the philosophy and the Arabic-Islamic exegesis of Aristotle’s writings.

The rule of al-amr bi-l-maʿrūf wa-l-nahy ʿan al-munkar: cf. Anawati (1996). 163 On the reasons for this religious policy of al-Maʾmūn cf. Gutas (1998), 111–122. 164 Anawati (1996). 165 These were the reasons which made them eager to possess as many Greek texts as possible in an unprecedented effort. The Arabic translators were mostly Melkite Christians, like al-Biṭrīq (‘the Patrikios’), or Nestorians, like the family of Ḥunayn ibn Isḥāq, or even Jacobites, like Ibn Nāʿima al-Ḥimṣī. Most of them were Syriac-speakers.

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